NIGHT THE BOOK

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IF IN MY LIFETIME I WAS TO WRITE only one book, this would be the one. Just as the past lingers in the present, all my writ- ings after Night, including those that . Night () is a work by Elie Wiesel about his experience with his father in the Nazi German concentration camps at Auschwitz and Buchenwald in –, . Start by marking “Night (The Night Trilogy, #1)” as Want to Read: My first reading of Elie Wiesel's Night occurred during this year's Holocaust Memorial Day. Night is Elie Wiesel's memoir about his experiences during the Holocaust.


Night The Book

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*FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Alert: This product may be shipped with or without the inclusion of the Oprah Book Club sticker. Please note that regardless . Unforgettable memoir of teen who survived the Holocaust. Read Common Sense Media's Night review, age rating, and parents guide. Night is a memoir by Elie Wiesel that was first published in Read a Plot Overview of the entire book or a chapter by chapter Summary and Analysis.

His instructor, Moshe the Beadle, returns from a near-death experience and warns that Nazi aggressors will soon threaten the serenity of their lives. However, even when anti-Semitic measures force the Sighet Jews into supervised ghettos, Elie's family remains calm and compliant. In spring, authorities begin shipping trainloads of Jews to the Auschwitz-Birkenau complex.

Elie's family is part of the final convoy. In a cattle car, eighty villagers can scarcely move and have to survive on minimal food and water. At midnight on the third day of their deportation, the group looks in horror at flames rising above huge ovens and gags at the stench of burning flesh. Guards wielding billy clubs force Elie's group through a selection of those fit to work and those who face a grim and improbable future. Elie and his father Chlomo lie about their ages and depart with other hardy men to Auschwitz, a concentration camp.

Night: Elie Wiesel's memoir and how it preserved the Jewish identity

Elie's mother and three sisters disappear into Birkenau, the death camp. After viewing infants being tossed in a burning pit, Elie rebels against God, who remains silent.

Every day, Elie and Chiomo struggle to keep their health so they can remain in the work force. Sadistic guards and trustees exact capricious punishments. After three weeks, Elie and his father are forced to march to Buna, a factory in the Auschwitz complex, where they sort electrical parts in an electronics warehouse. The savagery reaches its height when the guards hang a childlike thirteen year old, who dies slowly before Elie's eyes.

Despairing, Elie grows morose during Rosh Hashanah services.

At the next selection, the doctor culls Chlomo from abler men. Chlomo, however, passes a second physical exam and is given another chance to live.

How It All Goes Down

Elie undergoes surgery on his foot. The Wiesels and their fellow prisoners are forced to run through a snowy night in bitter cold over a forty-two mile route to Gleiwitz.

Elie binds his bleeding foot in strips of blanket. Inmates who falter are shot. The anguish of the past is still snagged on the barbed wire, and a terrible misery stagnates over the camp, its spores infiltrating the hearts of visitors in the 21st century.

The Story of ‘Night’

The desolation is overwhelming. A person's name is subliminally bound up in the fabric of their existence: it tethers them to the past and anticipates their future remembrance.

When seeking to expunge every vestige of Jewish identity from Europe, the Nazis were not content to uproot each and every Jew, rob them of their worldly possessions, shave their hair and clothe them in rags: the ultimate affront to their identity was the replacing of every prisoner's name with a number.

This was integral to the Nazis' desire to dehumanise the Jews: a number on a list carries far fewer intimate human connotations than a name.

In Night, Wiesel and the other inmates were "told to roll up our left sleeves and file past the table. The three 'veteran' prisoners, needles in hands, tattooed numbers on our left arms.

I became A From then on, I had no other name. Yet, at times, his descriptions are so striking as to be breathtaking in their pungent precision. He writes through the eyes of an adolescent plunged into an unprecedented moral hinterland, and his loss of innocence is felt keenly by the reader. His identity was strained under such conditions: "The student of Talmud, the child I was, had been consumed by the flames.

All that was left was a shape that resembled me. My soul had been invaded — and devoured — by a black flame. Wiesel recalled one inmate whose starvation drove him to approach two untended cauldrons of soup on a suicidal mission, which resulted in his being shot by a guard.

The victim fell to the floor writhing, "his face stained by the soup. Perhaps even less: a famished stomach.Infobase Publishing.

Madness lies at the end of it. They had stuck together for three years, "always near each other, for suffering, for blows, for the ration of bread, for prayer", but the rabbi had lost sight of him in the crowd and was now scratching through the snow looking for his son's corpse.

Hawley would say, It lacked sentence variation. The story is a heartbreaking, terrifying account This is not a review.

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